Taste Albuquerque’s Growing Farm to Table Food Scene

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Albuquerque’s farm to table food scene might surprise you. From trendy restaurants to craft breweries and organic chocolatiers — you’ll find it all in this New Mexican city. Here’s a delicious sampling of local-focused, sustainable and organic restaurants and food makers in Albuquerque.

Food is truly farm fresh at CAMPO at Los Poblanos Historic Inn and Organic Farm in Albuquerque, New Mexico

Food is truly farm fresh at CAMPO at Los Poblanos Historic Inn and Organic Farm (Photo credit: Colleen Lanin)

CAMPO

Los Poblanos Historic Inn and Organic Farm grows their own lavender, green peppers, jujubes, herbs and figs for use in their on-site restaurant, CAMPO. Beyond their own produce and eggs, they focus on serving organic and locally sourced fruits, vegetables, and meats. They also hand-knead and bake their own bread daily. Los Poblanos is happy to accommodate diners with all sorts of food preferences and allergies. For gluten-sensitive and celiac eaters, they offer some gluten-free dishes and baked goods, too. This casual fine-dining restaurant is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Did I mention they raise bees for their own honey?

The Grove's farm to table fruit-topped pancakes in Albuquerque

The Grove’s farm to table fruit-topped pancakes (Photo credit: Colleen Lanin)

The Grove Cafe & Market

Lauren Green, who co-owns The Grove Cafe & Market with her husband, said, “We’re crazy about being at the forefront of good food in Albuquerque.” The Grove dishes out delicious, sustainable breakfasts and brunches to crowds of hungry fans. The most popular item on their menu? Thin crepe-like pancakes topped with a rainbow of fresh fruits. Speaking of which, if you’re sick of ordering a side of fruit and getting a tired slice of cantaloupe, you’ll love The Grove. They don’t offer cantaloupe, because that’s what most other restaurants do. Green boasted, “We will never do what everyone else does!” Be sure to get a bag of their homemade gluten-free granola to go.

Albuquerque's organic coffee maker, Sol Rio

Coffee roaster at Albuquerque’s organic coffee maker, Sol Rio (Photo credit: Colleen Lanin)

Sol Rio Coffee

Perk up with a visit to organic coffee maker, Sol Rio Coffee. Go here for tastings or to buy a bag of beans to bring home as an energizing and tasty souvenir of Albuquerque. A couple of brews are always available in the lobby to sample. If he isn’t too busy roasting beans, extroverted Sol Rio Coffee Co-owner Allen Bassett will even be happy to give you a quick tour of the facility. Their piñon coffee, with a hint of pine nut flavor, is the brew of choice here.

Enchiladas topped with a pasture-raised egg at El Pinto in Albuquerque, New Mexico

Enchiladas topped with a pasture-raised egg at El Pinto (Photo credit: Colleen Lanin)

El Pinto

Come to El Pinto for fresh and delicious traditional New Mexican cuisine. This massive restaurant boasts 1,200 seats indoors and across five patios, which are heated with wood-burning fireplaces. Hatch chiles are the star of the menu and the state’s take on Mexican fare. Try your enchiladas Christmas-style with both green and red sauce so you can answer New Mexico’s Official State Question: Red or green? Everything at El Pinto is made from family recipes, using organic and locally raised products as much as possible. Conscientious diners will be happy to know they only serve pasture-raised, animal-welfare approved eggs — many of which are laid by the 300 hens they keep on property. Before you leave, buy a jar of their handmade salsas (made with Hatch chiles, of course)!

The darling Farm and Table Restaurant in Albuquerque, NM

The darling Farm and Table Restaurant (Photo credit: Colleen Lanin)

Farm & Table

Local and mostly organic ingredients star in the brunch and dinner dishes at Farm & Table. Expect changing seasonal menus with made-from-scratch plates, like Breakfast Tacos with carne adovada, mashed potatoes, farm eggs, green chile, avocado and cheese. For dinner, you might choose Cherry Molasses Glazed Pork Belly to start, followed by a Rustic Quinoa Salad or Buttermilk Fried Chicken. Save room for dessert because they make their own pastries, ice cream and hand-ground chocolate creations. Farm & Table’s Executive Chef Carrie Eagle triumphed on her episode of the Food Network’s popular show, “Chopped.” After dining here, I can see why.

Parmesan Zucchini Ribbons with Lemon Aioli at Sixty-Six Acres are part of Albuquerque's farm to table food scene

Parmesan Zucchini Ribbons with Lemon Aioli at Sixty-Six Acres (Photo credit: Colleen Lanin)

Sixty-Six Acres

Using products sourced from Albuquerque and the rest of New Mexico when available, Sixty-Six Acres serves an interesting mix of farm to table healthy and decadent dishes. Locally produced craft beers and spirits are their jam, with 14 Albuquerque breweries and eight distillers represented. They make their own shrubs for cocktails, too, using fresh fruit, sugar, and vinegar. As for food, everything our group ordered was delicious, but the appetizers reigned supreme. With goodies like Parmesan Zucchini Ribbons with lemon aioli or Crispy Brussels (sprouts) with green chile glaze and white balsamic reduction — how can you resist? When the weather is nice, expect a dog party on the patio with local pups happily joining their human companions.

Organic, fair-trade, hand-crafted chocolates at El Dora Chocolates in Albuquerque, NM

Organic, fair-trade, handmade chocolates at El Dora Craft Chocolate (Photo credit: Colleen Lanin)

Eldora Craft Chocolate

Owner Steve Prickett turned his passion for chocolate into a hobby, and now it’s grown into this sweet business. Everything at Eldora Craft Chocolate is organic, fair trade, and compostable (except for their plastic candy trays trays, for which you get a small credit when brought back to refill). This bean to bar chocolatier roasts their own cocoa beans to draw out specific flavors. Stop by to pick up your choice of dark chocolate confections like Peanut Butter or Blood Orange Truffles. They also make candy bars in flavors like Tart Cherry or Pumpkin Pie Spice. Contact them directly in advance to set up a chocolate tasting for a fee.

A cider sample at Sidetrack Brewing Company in Albuquerque

A cider sample at Sidetrack Brewing Company (Photo credit: Colleen Lanin)

Farm to Table Albuquerque Food Tours

To taste an array of Albuquerque’s farm to table offerings, sign up for a tour with Routes Bicycle Tours & Rentals. Choose from three Gourmet tour options: Breweries, Wineries or Chiles.

During our ride, we stopped by Sidetrack Brewing Company for sips of their own cask beers and other brews. This small brewery and cask room also pours gluten-free ciders from the Albuquerque-based Tractor Brewing Company, as well as non-alcoholic beverages for the kids. To accompany your suds, get a bag of addictive flavored popcorn, made by New Mexico company, Cornivore.

Farm to Table Cuisine in Albuquerque, New Mexico

Farm to table food is better for you, the animals, and the planet. It’s also better tasting. So, book your trip to Albuquerque and pull up a chair to the table for some delicious eats in this appetizing New Mexico City!

Save these Albuquerque Farm to Table Food Scene Tips

Considering a trip to New Mexico? Be sure to save these tips for exploring Albuquerque’s farm to table cuisine. Just pin the image above to Pinterest. Go ahead and follow Travel Mamas on Pinterest while you’re at it!

If you’re hungry to learn more, then take a look at these 14 enchanting things to do in Albuquerque with kids!

Which of these Albuquerque farm to table food and drinks sound tastiest to you? Let us know in the comments below.

A Note from The Travel Mama: Visit Albuquerque hosted my visit. I did not receive any monetary compensation related to this blog post. All opinions are mine, as always.

About Colleen Lanin

Colleen Lanin is the founder/editor-in-chief of TravelMamas.com. As the author of her book, "The Travel Mamas' Guide," she teaches parents not only how to survive a trip with children, but also how to love exploring the world with their offspring. Her stories have appeared online and in print for such outlets as the "Today" show, NBCNews.com, Parenting Magazine, Orlando Sentinel, Chicago Tribune, Expedia, San Diego Family Magazine, and more. Colleen gives tips on television, radio, and as a public speaker. She has a master’s degree in business administration with a background in marketing. She lives in Arizona with her husband and two kids.

Comments
  1. This is so great! I love the farm to table movement. It’s the closest thing you can have to fresh from the garden unless you actually HAVE a garden.

  2. The food looks extremely delicious and healthy. A combo hard to find these days. 😊😋

  3. Sarah Bailey says

    This is so interesting to read. I love that they are pushing getting things from farm to table quickly. And helping support more local produce!

    • Colleen Lanin says

      It was amazing to see how many restaurants and companies really focuses on locally produced food. It’s great for the local community AND it makes everything taste better!

  4. Jaye Shields says

    I have an ABQ layover coming up so I’ll keep this most in mind. That piñon coffee sounds good!

  5. Sara | mshealthesteem.com says

    The food looks amazing! And the place is amazing! Farm to table is so important. I’m glad you had a wonderful time there. Thanks for sharing your experience with us 🙂

  6. Terri Steffes says

    One of my favorite experiences is to visit a farm-to-table farm. Many St. Louis restaurants are farming their own food now, which is super exciting!

    • Colleen Lanin says

      I love that farm to table is becoming so popular! It’s so important for good health, a happy Earth and delicious food!

  7. Something about this is somewhat a very special eating experience. It’s like catching fish then cooking it to eat. :0)

  8. Yay! Local foods! I’m not very familiar with Albuquerque, are local produce and farm to table concept not common? I’m actually doing research for a food talk on the local movement and I’m curious to know what made the region embrace it … and if there are any disadvantages of it.

    • Colleen Lanin says

      Hi Daniela – The farm to table concept seemed to be quite prevalent in Albuquerque. I would suggest reaching out to any of the restaurants/food makers in this story to see if you can interview any of the owners for your food talk. Good luck!

  9. Wendy Polisi says

    I love that more places are focusing on farm to table. I think it does a wonderful thing for the economy.

  10. Laurie Rooney says

    All looks delicious!! ❤️❤️

  11. This looks awesome. Thanks for sharing.

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